Defining your projects

The most important thing to is know WHY you want a project.

The most important thing to is know WHY you want a project.

Let’s follow on from last week’s blog on success and see what you can do to see if you are taking on board the messages. Successful projects need to lead to successful business outcomes and unless a project is adequately defined, it is unlikely to achieve anything, except perhaps a hole in your budget. Take any project that you are associated with and check that it is satisfactorily defined:

  • If you don’t know why you are doing the project, consider terminating it.
  • If you don’t know what you are delivering, regard your costs and timescales as unstable and your risk high.
  • If you don’t know when it will be done, carry out more investigations until you do know.
  • If you don’t know how you will approach the project, regard risk as high and investigate further.

“Project Definition” is a term used in The Project Workout, alternatives include:

  • Project Initiation Document or Dossier (PRINCE2)
  • Project management plan (PMI, APM)

Use this checklist to review any projects currently in progress.

  • Has a project definition been written, reviewed by the stakeholders and approved by the project sponsor?
  • Do the scope and objectives of the project meet the needs of the business?
  • Have the benefits been fully assessed and quantified wherever possible?
  • Do the benefits match the needs?
  • Have all significant risks been identified, categorised and taken into account in the plan and business case?
  • Has a comprehensive and satisfactory work breakdown been developed?
  • Does the work breakdown reflect the deliverables to be produced?
  • Are all key logical relationships between projects and activities clear?
  • Has the plan been developed to minimise or offset the risks?

The only way a project can be delivered is through its deliverables. For each deliverable check:

  • is the deliverables relevant and feasible both to produce and use?
  • Have quality criteria been established?
  • Is it clear who is accountable for preparing each deliverable?
  • Is it clear who will review the deliverable prior to acceptance?
  • Is it clear who will approve each deliverable?
  • Has sufficient time been allowed for reviewing/amending each deliverable?

For more on this see The Project Workout, Part Four which takes you through project set up and gives you some templates you can use.

PPM but not as we know it – learn from the Romans

Emperor Sponsus - visionary and leaderI am sure you’ll want to go home, put your feet up and forget about your programmes and projects for a while . . . but what if withdrawal symptoms set in and you have that urge to peek at your Blackberry or just take a look at that last report . . . help is at hand with a book extolling the virtues of programme and project management on the scale of the Roman Empire. Follow Emperor Sponsus on his path to glory and the trials and tribulations of general Marcus Projex Magna as he struggles to turn Sponsus’ vision into a reality.

This is programme management that you won’t learn about at Saeed Business School’s BT Centre for Major Programme Management in Oxford, nor from PMI or APM or MSP, nor anywhere else, for that matter.

Click here to download your cartoon book: How Rome was lost

Leaders influence success. What a surprise!

In PMI’s latest annual survey on trends in programme and project management there are a number of messages but I’ll draw out just one, which they describe as “interesting” and which they say has the greatest correlation to project success.

In programmes and projects, sponsorship is not like sponsoring Tom to run a Marathon.

Those organisations which have active project/programme sponsors on at least 80% of their projects have a success rate of 75%, eleven percentage points higher than the average.

Their survey sample included over 1000 PPM professionals with a wide range of experience and from many industries. This mirrors work by McKinsey & Co, who also point out that sponsors have an extraordinary influence on success.

So, the PMI is saying is that if we have programme and project sponsors, who do their role properly, the business is much more likely to succeed! Calling that “interesting” is rather understating it importance. This is a finding which we should be making “loud and clear” . . . . too many organisations are so tied to their functional hierarchies, that this “end to end”, leadership role is under-valued or even forgotten.

This finding mirrors my work in The Project Workout since 1997 and more recent findings from the UK’s Cabinet Office and National Audit Office. It does make you wonder that if this role is so vital, why it is outside the scope of PMBok and the latest ISO21500? However, it is very much integrated within BS6079 Part 1, MSP (equivalent to SRO) and PRINCE2 (equivalent to Executive), so we have some good foundations to build on. By the way, don’t get confused with sponsoring in the form of “sponsoring Tom to run a marathon”; that is an entirely different use of the word.

To find out more on leadership and sponsorship, look at Chapter 4 of The Project Workout; you’ll also find some articles in the Community section of my web site.

What is your experience? Let me know.