Audits and assurance. What’s the difference?

What is the difference between an “audit” and “assurance?

I was recently asked, “What is the difference between an “audit” and “assurance”? I like simple questions like this as they can tease out a lot of hidden meanings and misunderstandings. These two words are used frequently and in many different contexts; most of the time people understand what is meant . . . but not always. It is only when the question is asked, that you have to put your brain in gear and start thinking.5-going-ok

As project management has grown as a discipline, a lot of organizations have come up with their own definitions or uses of these words, which were already in use in other disciplines. The terms are often qualified such as:

  • Business assurance – checking the project is viable in business terms
  • Technical assurance – checking the solution is the right on and will work
  • User assurance – checking users get what they need.
  • Quality assurance – ensuring standards and procedures are used
  • Configuration audit – keeping track on all the bits of the solution
  • Financial audit – checking the financial figures reflect reality

You also find the word “review” is often tacked on to “assurance”, hence “assurance reviews”, which can add whole new dimension.

What do the words mean?

It is always a good idea to use words which have a commonly understood meaning, as it makes communication and understanding so much easier. Most people don’t have the time or inclination to understand jargon and nuances which are used to make academic distinctions. Dictionaries are the guardians for this and so, do use them; here are some dictionary definitions of the words:

  • Audit: 1) an official examination of accounts 2) A systematic review or assessment of something.
  • Review: a formal assessment of something with the intention of instituting change if necessary
  • Assurance: positive declaration that a thing is true.

“Audit”, being associated with financial accounts and independent auditors, has an “official” connotation; audits are usually planned, formally undertaken events. In the case of financial audits there are very strict rules on how they are conducted. People are often very wary when told the auditors want to see them; they often think in terms of “passing an audit”. Personally, I have found in healthy companies people welcome audits as it gives them a chance to raise issues which they have found intractable.

“Review”, on the other hand can have a softer meaning, more “helpful” meaning and can imply less formality, although this is not always the case. PMOs often use “review” so as not to scare people! This is how accountants use the terms:

  • Audit — an intensive examination with the highest level of assurance.
  • Review — some analytical procedures conducted with limited assurance

“Assurance” is different, you can have an “audit” or a “review” but you do not have “an assurance”. It is more of a state; you are assured that your project will meet its business objectives. Audits and reviews are simply two forms of assurance related activity.

Where does risk fit into this?

The terms “risk” and “audit” are often linked; Risk based internal audit (RBIA) is an internal method which is primarily focused on the inherent risk involved in the activities or system and provides assurance that risk is being managed, by the management team, within the defined risk appetite level. It has had a very high profile since the collapse of companies like Enron and the introduction of Sarbanes Oxley in the USA. In this connection, you’ll probably come across what is often termed “three lines of defence”:

  • 1st line: business operations, who own and manage risks; risk and control in the business, ensuring the identification and treatment of risk is built into standard management practices.
  • 2nd line: oversight functions, who design policies, set direction, introduce best practice and ensure compliance to ensure the whole management effort works as an integrated whole.
  • 3rd line: independent assurance providers such as internal audit and external assurance providers.

So what can you do in practice?

So what does this all mean for you in a programme and project management context? As always, it depends. You are likely to have this problem if you are responsible for a company-wide programme and project method or if you are responsible for a major programme. If you are a programme o project sponsor then “assurance” is a key aspect of your role. You will be the one asking for audits and reviews . . . although your senior management may also call for them.

In a company context, check how the terms are already used; make contact with the internal audit department and the risk group and work with them. In a programme context, decide how much you want the programme to be driving audits and reviews and how much should be driven externally, always remembering that at a programme level, you’ll need to fill any gaps in corporate capabilities. If there is no corporate audit or review capabilities, the programme team will have to design everything, except the 3rd line of defence assurance, themselves.

 

Case study

Here is how I approached it in one major company:

The programme and project management method included roles definitions which included assurance and risk management accountabilities. There were three supporting procedures relating to these:

  1. a single risk management procedure for use at any level in the programme from work package upwards.
  2. A procedure for auditing a programme or project;
  3. A procedure for reviewing a programme or project;

The programme and project management risk procedure dovetailed into the corporate risk management process, using the same terms and activities (based on ISO 31000). This ensured ease of transfer of risks across boundaries and simpler tools support.

The audit procedure was based on group internal audit’s formal auditing process. This was only used on major programmes which had their own quality and assurance departments. By mirroring group internal audit’s approach we ensured that the method could not be challenged, ensuring that the findings and recommendations were the focus.

The review process was designed to be used by programme and project management practitioners, not directly involved in the work, to review the work of others, based on a brief given by the sponsor. It was simpler and quicker than an audit as it took a less formal approach and was supported by (but not limited to) check-lists and tools.

Do poor project sponsors drive failure?

I was speaking at a PMI conference early in Sweden in March, which gave me the opportunity to sit in on a number of other sessions. This one is all about programme and project sponsorship. It is a topic close to my heart and one I have blogged on before and no doubt will again . . . but is is a topic that business leaders actually care about?

In programmes and projects, sponsorship is not like sponsoring Tom to run a Marathon. Do too many business leaders believe it is someone else's job?

In programmes and projects, sponsorship is not like sponsoring Tom to run a Marathon. Do too many business leaders believe it is someone else’s job?

On the point of sponsorship, here are the key messages Peter Taylor gave out at his presentation on sposorship:

  • 85% of organisations had sponsors in place
  • 83% of organisations don’t train/support/guide sponsors
  • 100% of respondents believed that having a good sponsor was key to project success.

PMI’s recent Pulse of the profession showed that those organisations with active sponsors are more likely to have better project outcomes. This is supported by Colin Price’s research (McKinsey). Standish believes ‘The most important person in the project is the executive sponsor. The executive sponsor is ultimately responsible for the success and failure of the project’. I agree.
BUT most spend business leaders spend less than 5% of their time on sponsor related activity, yet this is all about making change happen – leading change. . . . and mismanaging change is the commonest reason CEOs get fired.
If you look at project failure, six reasons are cited and the top FOUR of those come under the accountability of the sponsor.

  • 40% Unrealistic goals
  • 38% Poor alignment of project and organisation objectives
  • 34% Inadequate human resources
  • 32% Lack of strong leadership
  • 21% Unwillingness of team members to identify Issues
  • 19% Ineffective risk management

So despite all this wealth of research and learning, many business leaders continue to ignore the issue or treat it informally. Everyone says they believe it is critical to project success and yet:

  • Sponsors are not ‘trained’ to be effective
  • Sponsors do not have the ‘time’ to be effective
  • Sponsors are just expected to ‘know’ how to do the job.

Is that right?
Is it even worth bothering about?

Peter then showed some broad-brush estimates of the value of good sponsorship:

  1. Meeting Project Goals +29% variance with good sponsorship in place
  2. Project Failure -13% variance without good project sponsorship in place

So if you have a £1bn portfolio, the range of benefits and costs is:
+ £290m
– £130m
Peter argues that those figures are certainly worth thinking about.I certainly agree. I also wonder that if senior leaders are only spending 5% of their time on sponsorship, what are they actually doing and who do they think is looking after the future of the business?

You can see Peter’s paper here – Project managers are from Mars, project sponsors from Venus

Change, communications and sponsorship

Since the Project Workout was first published, I have advocated projects as the vehicles for achieving strategic objectives or as I often say, projects are the vehicles of change. When I first wrote this in the late 90s, most people were still focused on deliverables and outputs, but, I am pleased to say the drive to towards benefits driven project management as standard is gaining momentum. This blog picks up on Steve Delgrosso’s views.
PMI’s Pulse of the Profession reviews are really starting to focus on the outcomes from projects being the most critical thing from senior management a senior management viewpoint (hurray!). Steve DelGrosso, from PMI, gives his views on what the priorities need to be, if organisations are to keep pace with the escalating rate of change. In his view, these are:

  • Priority One – communications
  • Priority Two – sponsor engagement

This mirrors McKinsey’s Colin Price’s findings about the essential role of the project sponsor in his book, Beyond Performance Management. It also mirrors the view that to be effective, senior management must not only have a vision, but also be able to communicate it.
A look at PMI’s research shows that organizations report that only 52 percent of their strategic initiatives are successful. The failure of strategic initiatives has a significantly greater financial impact than just project failure: they say that nearly 15 percent of every dollar spent on strategic initiatives is wasted–US$149 million for every US$1 billion spent. By comparison, PMI’s 2014 Pulse of the Profession® study finds that US$109 million is wasted for every US$1 billion invested in projects.

So, not much seems to have changed since David Munt, founder of GenSight, did a similar study in 2002. His research suggested between 35 and 50 per cent of all investment is directed to unsuccessful projects and that about 30 per cent of project investment by FTSE 100 organisations in 2000 actually destroyed shareholder value!
Strategic initiatives are the programmes and projects though which an organization’s strategy is implemented. By their nature, strategic initiatives drive change to transform an organization from current state to future state.
Failed projects can result in huge financial losses for an organization, but a failed strategic initiative has an impact far beyond just the costs of the initiative. When an organization embarks on change, it’s likely that systems, processes, vendors and perhaps even the overall organizational mindset (or mission) will be impacted. Failure to successfully enable sustainable change can lead to an organization losing its competitive advantage.

Select the right projects to support your strategy Selecting the right projects will help you achieve your objectives by realising benefits which support your strategy.

Select the right projects to support your strategy

I have a feeling there will be a lot more blogs on this topic as it challenges the prevalent “iron triangle” or “triple constraint” view of project management, and builds on it. Developers of standard and proprietary methods take note! In the meantime, have a look at The Project Workout, Chapter 3, page 50 and Chapter 15, page 198, in particular.

Portfolio management – the next frontier?

Earlier this month I was speaking at the “Passion for Projects” conference in Sweden. I must say it was a really well organised event and I was delighted to have been invited to speak there. The topic I chose to talk about covered portfolios, project, projects, matrices and maturity. I’ll go into it more in some later blogs. I’ll assume you know a little about portfolio management. Just to recap, portfolio management is all about making sure you pick the right projects to do.  In “The Project Workout” i call them “business programmes” as at the time I wrote the book, the term “portfolio” hadn’t really settled down in the way it has now.  So, in portfolio management you have to make decisions on what to do and which meet the following criteria:

  1. It is aligned to your strategy
  2. You have the resources to undertake it and operate its outcome
  3. The risks are acceptable  (i.e. robust business case)
  4. The portfolo, as whole is still balance if you take this on
  5. The organisation can absorb the change.

So, the decision makers need to bbe able to make those decisions and have the data available to verify the criteria.

I was asked a question about this: “If a programme has been approved as part of a portfolio, has the programme sponsor the authority to authorise the project within the programme, or do they all have to be referred to the decision maker at portfolio level?”

My instincts were that if the programme as a whole has been approved, then the programme sponsor should be able to make the decisions . . . however it is not that simple. It all comes down to shared impact. For example, if the programme team has all their own “ring-fenced” resources, then they can make decisions relating to criteria 2. If they share resources with other programmes or components of the portfolio, then they can’t. Similarly, if they are the only ones impacting a “target user group” (change absorbtion) then they can verify criteria 5. If niot, then the decision has been elevated.

Further, the degree of to which there is knowledge of the programme, its resources and impacts at the time it was approved also matters. It may be that the first chunks of work are pretty weel known and as long as these stay in the bounds expected, decision making can be at programme level.

As you see, what appears to be a simple question is actually very complex. The more you ring-fence resources, the greater you can delegate decisions to programme sponsors but, you lose potential efficiencies for using those resources on other work. It’s a balance. Whatever you choose, remember:

  1. What ever you do must align with your strategy
  2. There is little point in authorising work that cannot be undertaken – in fact it is really damaging
  3. You need to ensure the risks of adding this to your work-stack are acceptable
  4. You nee to ensure your portfolio remains balanced, when you add the new work in
  5. There is little point in doing work, which the operational teams, customer etc cannot accommodate in terms of change.

You’ll find a lot more about this in The Project Workout, section 3. Many organisations are only just starting to “get it”; it’s all applied common sense.

 

What to do about ineffective sponsors

The sponsor's behaviours set the tone for everyone but are they always beneficial?

The sponsor’s behaviours set the tone for everyone but are they always beneficial?

Research from Scott Keller and Colin Price (McKinsey’s) in their book,”Beyond Performance: HowGreat Organizations Build Ultimate Competitive Advantage,” points to programme or project sponsorship as being the most critical factor in achieving project success. I agree with them. Unfortunately in organisations with low maturity in programme and project management, this role is often  totally missing, misunderstood or the behaviours promote the wrong outcomes. This doesn’t seem to be an uncommon problem. But what can you do about it? One writer, Peter Taylor, proposes that a PMO could act as a surrogate “sponsor” and be used to help senior executives understand and perform that role better.

Have a look at his full article here, and see what you think.

Now imagine, if sponsorship was done well, what a difference that would make: programmes and projects would link to strategy, be prioritised on the basis of business benefit and only done if the need or opportunity is compelling . . . even if money is left over in the annual budget!!! Perhaps we could even go as far as the funds being assigned to the projects themselves, rather than to departments (cost centres) doing the work; now there’s a thought. CFOs, pay attention! Also consider, how can “portfolio management” work, if the role of the sponsor is not understood?

Let me know your thoughts on this. Are the programme and project sponsors in your organisation effective? If so, how did you achieve that? If not, how are you tackling the problem? I think that this is one of the great challenges to improving programme and project performance; there is only so much the “middle” can do, the “top” needs to play their part too.

See also my blog, “Enemies within” in which I argue senior management get the peformance they deserve. Controversial, eh?

Whose success is it?

In my “enemies within” blog, we looked at how management get the project performance they deserve. In that blog we explored the important role of the programme and project sponsor in making sure that an organisation’s programmes and projects succeed. But what does “success” mean? Success is too often interpreted through the differing eyes of stakeholders.

Successful project management ensures the delivery of a specified scope, on time and to budget (PMI’s triple constraint). It is related to how efficiently a project is managed. This should be assessed during the project closure review, documented in a project closure report and measured by timeliness of delivery milestones, adherence to budgets and quality. This is commonly associated with the role of the project manager.

A successful project realises the business benefits it was set up to achieve as stated in a business case. It is related to the effectiveness of the project in meeting the objectives set. The post implementation review (post-project review) assesses this. Measures of success here must be indicative of the business objectives being achieved. This review therefore has to happen some time after the output of the project has been put into use. It is associated with the role of the project sponsor.

A successful organisation drives towards its strategic objectives while fulfilling expectations of shareholders, managers, employees and other stakeholders. Measures for this are at a corporate level and should be financial and non-financial, such as a balanced score card. This is associated with the role of the chief executive.

A project which has been successfully ‘project managed’, however, may actually deliver little of value to the organisation. Further, a ‘successful project’ may not further the strategic objectives of the organisation, as its objectives may be out of alignment organisations seeking to optimise their total portfolio of projects through the effective combination of project management, sponsorship and portfolio management. A failing company can be full of ‘successful project management’ and ‘successful projects’ all driving in different directions.

The PMI’s recent report, Pulse of the Profession 2013, has actually picked up the above themes, so may this will help senior business leaders realise the potential that effective and efficient project management has to drive their organisations.

Gartner goes one step further and state that organisations which grasp this first will have a enhanced competitive advantage over the others.

Whatever you do must help you move towards your strategic objective. Otherwise there's no point.

Whatever you do must help you move towards your strategic objective. Otherwise there’s no point.

References:

Enemies within – why it doesn’t work

Far too many projects fail.

Far too many projects fail.

Project management, in the modern sense, has been with us a long time now. Some people have spent most, if not all their careers engaged in it in one form or another. Research and anecdotal evidence, however, seems to indicate that we still don’t “get it”. Reports continue to be written on “causes of project failure”. Eminent committees are set up to “get to the root of the problem”, international and national standards are created and yet:

  • we still see failure.
  • we still see organisations which ignore the benefits.

Why is this? If I could answer that, then I would be able to charge massive consulting fees! The question is rather like that posed in “Hitchhikers guide to the galaxy” asking, “What is the meaning of life?”  As we all know, the answer is “42” – which doesn’t help us one jot. If I ever came across anyone who knew the solution to stopping “project failure”, I would be very skeptical.

So why can’t people grasp the significance and advantages of business-led project management? We have:

  • lots of good books – like the Project Workout!
  • National and international standards such as BS6079 and ISO21500
  • Leaned societies, like the APM and PMI
  • Conferences galore

Actually, when the Project Workout came out in 1997 it was probably the first to put project management in a business context; earlier books were focused on project management techniques.

Cover all four basesBack to the topic! Having good methods and process supported by good tools and systems with clear accountabilities is necessary but not enough. The critical difference comes from an organisation’s culture; how they behave and their values. Give me the right culture and mediocre process over poor culture and brilliant process, any day. Organisations where project management “doesn’t work”, are likely to have a culture which actively prevents it from working. For example, for project management to be effective, we need more than just good project managers; for example:

  • project sponsorship is vital if the projects are to be linked to strategy
  • portfolio management (called business programme management in the Project Workout) is necessary to balance risk and choose those projects which will get you towards your strategic intent faster
  • finance systems, which enable project sponsors, managers and teams to see, their operational figures “live”
  • resource management so you can take account of constraints in choosing and implementing your projects.

Hunter Thompson, in 1970, said “In a democracy, people usually get the kind of government they deserve and they deserve what they get.” In this he blames the people in a democracy. Organisations, however are not democracies and so I would turn that quotation on its head:

Senior teams get the project management performance they deserve“.

The CEO sets the culture and “the way they want to run their business” and the following list indicates where the culture and values promote failure, rather than success. Running a project is difficult enough, but we often make it more arduous than it need be by creating problems for ourselves. Here are a few examples:

  1. Reorganising – either the company or a part of it. Tinkering with your structure is usually NOT the solution to your problems, it just confuses people. If you are a senior executive, however, reorganising is a great way to hide non-delivery!
  2. Functional thinking – not taking the helicopter, the organisation-wide view. This often happens when executives’ or individuals’ bonuses are based on targets which are at odds with the organisation’s needs, e.g. sales bonus rewarded on revenue, regardless of profit or contribution.
  3. Having too many rules – the more rules you have, the more sinners you create and the less happy your people become. Have you ever met a happy bureaucrat?
  4. Disappearing and changing sponsors – without a sponsor there should be no project. Continual changing of the ‘driver’ will cause you to lose focus and forget WHY you are undertaking the project. Consider terminating such a project to see who really wants it!
  5. Ignoring the risks – risks don’t go away, so acknowledge them and manage them. If I said that a certain aeroplane is likely to crash, would you fly on it? And yet, every day executives approve projects when a simple risk analysis shows they are highly likely to fail.
  6. Dash in and get on with it! – if a project is that important, you haven’t the time NOT to plan your way ahead. High activity levels do not necessarily mean action or progress.
  7. Analysis paralysis – you need to investigate, but only enough to gain the confidence to move on. This is the opposite to dash in and ignore the risks. It is also a ploy used to delay projects: ‘. . . I haven’t quite enough information to make a decision, just do some more study work.’
  8. Untested assumptions – all assumptions are risks; treat them as such.
  9. Forgetting what the project is for – if this happens, terminate the project. If it is that useful, someone will scream and remember why it is being done.
  10. Executive’s ‘pet projects’ – have no exceptions. If an executive’s idea is really so good, it should stand up to the scrutiny that all the others go through. He or she may have a helicopter view, but might also have their head in the clouds.

I’m sure you can add to that list, so please do, by adding a comment. Over the next few months, I’ll investigate a number of the above symptoms.

In the meantime, you can find out more about these from The Project Workout (4th edition):

  • lessons on what works: Chapter 2
  • enemies within – page 41
  • sponsorship: Chapter 4
  • portfolio management: Chapters 14 and 15
  • resource management: Chapter 16
  • finances: Chapter 17

Be a nut, be a leader!

Leadership

A leaders on his or her own is useless. There must be followers and the “first follower” is the most important, if change is to happen.

Do you think leadership is glorious? Is change totally dependent on the
leader? Do you think if a person looks ridiculous, they aren’t a leader?
Have a look at this video from Derek Sivers, I think you’ll enjoy it . . . and you might change your views on leadership:

See the Dancing Guy video.

So what’s the bottom line?

  1. If you are a version of the shirtless dancing guy, all alone, remember the importance of nurturing your first few followers as equals, making everything clearly about the movement, not you.
  2. Be public. Be easy to follow!
  3. But the biggest lesson here – did you catch it? – Leadership is over-glorified
  4. It started with the shirtless nut, and he’ll get all the credit, but it was the first follower who transformed a lone nut into a leader.
  5. There is no movement without the first follower.

We’re told we all need to be leaders, but that would be really ineffective. The best way to make a movement, if you really care, is to courageously follow and show others how to follow. So, when you find a lone nut doing something great . . . .

Have the guts to be the first person to stand up and join in.

Source: Derek Sivers; www.sivers.org

Business change through effective sponsorship

Is leading from the front always right?

All organisations have to change at some time, some more frequently than others. Something, somewhere always needs to be created or improved. Many leading organisations are now directing and managing change by using business-led, programme and project management techniques. As organisations have become more integrated through the use of complex systems and processes, the effectiveness of managing change through the traditional functional hierarchy has diminished. Programmes and projects, in the modern sense, are now strategic management tools, ideally suited to the complex organisations of today. Business leaders ignore the newly reborn discipline of enterprise-wide programme and project management at their peril. It is no longer the preserve of specialists in the engineering or IT sectors, but something every director and manager should have in their ‘tool box’. Well directed and managed programmes and projects enable an organisation to react and adapt speedily to meet the challenges of the competitive environment, ensuring the organisation drives towards attainable and visible corporate goals. Effective business-led programme and project management will increase the likelihood of business success by ensuring visibility, accountability and control over business change activities. In particular by:

  • linking business needs directly to visible actions plans;
  • enabling you to manage across every department in your organisation;
  • ensuring accountability can be assigned, safe in the knowledge any gaps are covered;
  • providing a flexible and responsive method to respond to changing needs;
  • focusing on priorities;
  • enabling you to track progress toward your business objectives.

It is not just the “project geeks” saying this now, but also strategy consultants, like McKinsey & Co. All senior executives should be leaders of change within the organisation. For some this may be a new experience. They will be in the position of advocating a new order, acting in the interest of the wider company needs rather than those of the department or line director they serve. For the first time, they may be operating outside their own departmental or functional structure. They will have to work with people they don’t have direct authority over and this may require all their influencing and leadership skills if they are to achieve their aims.

To summarise, the sponsor is the business advocate accountable for directing a programme or project to ensure the business objectives are met and benefits realised. In simple terms the sponsor role can be referred, exactly as that:

  • Programme sponsor
  • Project sponsor.

The UK public sector calls the roles “Project Executive”, for a project and “Senior Responsible Owner” for a programme. These are derived from the MSP and PRINCE2 methodologies respectively.

If I am a programme or project manager, what can I expect of my sponsor?  And what can I do if he or she doesn’t meet those expectations? You should expect your sponsor to:

  • Take an interest – their interest! It’s their programme or project!
  • Communicate their vision;
  • Be clear on what outcomes they need;
  • Agree the governance;
  • Keep you informed of the business context;
  • Challenge you;
  • Be realistic;
  • Make decisions and give you direction; and
  • Accept that all risks are their risks!

If you don’t get what you need, try acting as if they are the perfect sponsor:

Remember it’s “their project”, not yours;

  • Make your “personal contract” with them;
  • Assume they want to undertake their role;
  • Make requests for direction and decisions;
  • Look at the world through their eyes – outcomes and benefits;
  • Make the risks plain – their risks;
  • Report the world through their eyes;
  • Don’t assume or expect them to understand your “jargon”; and
  • Don’t try to take over their role.

You can read the full article from the Project Workout Community, articles section. In the meantime, who do you think is accountable for “making change happen”? Is there a simple answer? Is a project manager a change manager? Is a change manager a project manager? I suspect it all depends on how you views those words.

Sponsors – ignore your stakeholders at your peril

Keeping stakeholders engaged can be challenging

As a programme or project sponsor, the formal and informal interactions with your project manager will probably form your primary linkage for directing a project. You should not, however, rely solely on this route for information gathering. Remember, benefits do not come from the project itself, but from using the deliverables and outputs the project produces – those who use the outputs are called stakeholders! Engage them and keep engaging them. Listen to what they are saying, how they say it, what they are not saying and observe what they are doing.

  • Are they walking the talk?
  • Are they saying one thing but doing the opposite?

Even a good project manager will not pick up all the ‘messages’ from stakeholders, so do not think you are undermining him or her by checking behind the scenes, especially with those all important, senior stakeholders.

Be particularly sensitive if people start withdrawing resources:

  •   for their “other” really important project’;
  •   because they have lost confidence in you;
  •   because another sponsor has leant on them.

Is this their way of blocking your project? Are their people really engaged and signed up to the solution, or merely paying lip service? Never underestimate stakeholders’ ability to ruin your best laid plans, especially in a “weak matrix” organisation! It is the project manager’s and project sponsor’s role to ensure all stakeholders are adequately briefed and engaged. Too much communication will drown them – they won’t bother with it. Not enough will mean your project will be lower down their priority list than you want it to be. Agree with your project manager which stakeholders each of you will target.

There is also a series of articles from Project Manager Today, on sponsorship, in the Project Workout community site.